Entry 16: Horse of a Different Color

Entry 16: Horse of a Different Color

This week my coworkers got simultaneously sick, so I had to cover for them on my day off. I also played this game that has made me nervous and anxious for several days (I'll discuss more details next week). The reasons I bring all this up is because I have been busy and I haven't worked as much on my character designs like I said I would last week (excuses, excuses, am I right?). This week is also Derby week, which means I can't really take off an another day this week to catch up on personal projects (woe is me).

Anyways, this week I wanted to share my opinion on the stars of the Derby: horses. When I was little I saw kids who were normal and had dragon or kitten posters, but I was always confused why horses had such a following. I didn't think they were cute. They look slightly noble, but other than that I have always thought of horses as glorified modes of transportation.

It wasn't until last year when my roommate's friend came over to spend the night that my perspective on horses changed. She was a horse and dog trainer, and she taught me the term horsenality. The way she explained it was that people have personalities, horses have horsenalities, and so on. When she works with horses, she can't treat animals like they would understand human behavior and social norms, but rather she has to conform to their language.

This was a video she showed that changed my entire outlook on horses. Please pay no attention to the low quality or terrible choice of music, but pay mind to the horse.

It was jaw-dropping for me. I always thought that horses could only move forward really fast and sometimes ballet-step sideways. This nimbleness is unbelievable, majestic, and amazing. Horses are prey animals, which usually flee in dangerous situations, but this horse is trained to be like a predator mocking its prey.

A few weeks ago I also pet my first horse that I could remember. I went out with a coworker to a farm and he was photographing a day-old foal while I walked around. There was a small horse-barn thingy with two horses in their pens. I stood in the middle of the barn for a while before one of the horses began to stomp its hind foot. I never hung around horses, ever, so I wasn't sure if this was a territorial gesture or an invitation.

I decided to pace slowly toward the large creature, and it swayed its head to see me through the wooden bars. The place had a smelly smell to it, but now it was the least of my concerns. What if this horse was aggressive? I would assume it would kick the wooden supports of the pen to startle me, and I'm sure I would have been terrified. No one was around, just me and these two horses.

As I was standing next to the pen, the horse was apathetic and it began to scratch its head against the door. When its head rose and faced me, I reached out with my hand and rested it against the wooden bars of the pen, not wanting to intrude in its space. The horse met my hand and began to identify it with its nose. I swayed my hand up and down slowly, as to not startle the horse when I decided to reach in and pet it.

I softly scratched the bridge of its snout, because animals love it when you scratch them in places that they can't easily reach. The same can be said about my tenant's dog, Bobo.

The horse had coarse hair, and it was delighted for that brief moment of attention and it resumed eating hay. I was timid about this experience, especially because no one was around and I had no idea how this horse would behave. But at the end of the day, I pet my first horse.

Thanks for reading! What animals did you think were lametastic until you were proven otherwise? Please leave your comments in the section below, and I'll see you on next week's entry about Mother's Day.

 
Entry 17: Mother's Love

Entry 17: Mother's Love

Entry 15: The Concept of Character

Entry 15: The Concept of Character