Entry 36: Papercraft

Entry 36: Papercraft

I have always loved to create art, and more specifically, I have a greater appreciation for small art because of the skill that is required to make it. Take this video below as an example.

I have been working in papercraft/origami since I was in middle school. Back then, my favorite origami was a frog, because it could "jump" about two lengths of its size if it was made out of a full sheet of letter paper. If you made it out of credit card size piece of paper, however, the smaller size had greater tension, which allowed the frog to "jump" over 30 lengths of its size.

Origami Frog, via Pinterest

Origami Frog, via Pinterest

During college, I created a papercraft polar bear for my student advisor because he loved polar bears (he even donates to a polar bear website). Since he loved my gift so much, he was willing to gift me with his LEGO Star Wars Star Destroyer that was collecting dust at his house.

Papercraft Polar Bear, circa 2010

Papercraft Polar Bear, circa 2010

In addition to my love of creating things, Minecraft was a perfect fit for me. It wasn't until it was released on Xbox 360 that I finally purchased it. I also was subscribed to Achievement Hunter at the same time when they started playing it, so that, in turn, inspired me to create this project.

I downloaded most of these templates from planetminecraft.com and edited a few of them with Photoshop. I printed them with an Epson printer on Double-Weight Matte paper, which is considerably thicker than regular computer sheet paper. Because of its thickness, I had to use several tools and special techniques that I have developed over the years to create well-crafted papercraft art.

The supplies I used are as followed: a fine-tip pair of scissors for precise cutting, a dull blade from multifunction pliers to score the edges, regular school-grade glue, a pointed clay-carving tool (a paperclip or toothpick would also suffice), a pair of tweezers for applying good pressure, and, of course, a penny for size reference.

The whole process of one of these Minecraft-inspired papercrafts takes about an hour from start to finish. I filmed the entire process of one papercrafts with a point-and-shoot camera that was propped with a two-legged tripod (it's a long story).

My film setup, September 2014

My film setup, September 2014

Afterwards, I edited the video in PowerDirector 11 Deluxe, which is a decent program that allowed me to speed up parts of the video and add cations throughout. I would love to have used Final Cut Pro for the editing, but I can't justify that cost for the amount of times I would use it. The timecode I used was from mediacollege.com.

I used music from Free Music Archive, which is a great site filled with talented musicians who allow their work to be downloaded free for creative projects. The song I used is called "Readers! Do You Read?" by Chris Zabriskie. I have used his music in a lot of my videos, including this video below.

The gallery of each Minecraft character I created can be found in my Miscellaneous Projects. My next Minecraft-related project involves recreating a 1:1 scale of my college, which so far I have built a part of the library.

 
Entry 37: School Pride

Entry 37: School Pride

Entry 35: Never Forget

Entry 35: Never Forget